Snowfleas’ Soft Landing Gear

Naturally Curious with Mary Holland

3-17-17 snowflea IMG_0947Snow fleas, a species of springtail, are not a type of flea. Neither are they insects, though they are close relatives. During most of the year they live in the soil and leaf litter, consuming fungi and decaying vegetation. On warm winter days they appear on the surface of the snow, and are often described as “pepper on snow” due to their black color and tiny size (1 – 2 millimeters long).

Although they lack wings, they have two tail-like spring projections, or furcula, which are held like a spring against the bottom of their abdomen by a kind of latch. When the snow flea wants to move, the furcula springs downward, catapulting the snowflea as far as 100 times its body length. Snowfleas in the genus Hypogastrura possess three pinkish anal sacs which are usually located inside the snowflea, hidden from view. Just before jumping the snowflea everts these…

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Bats of New Jersey

What’s Not to Love?

Monday, March 20th
Time & Place:
7PM – 8:30PM
Room B-125 at Stockton University

CWF Biologist Larissa Smith discusses the bats of New Jersey. Bats suffer from a bad reputation among those who do not know them. In fact, as you will learn in this talk, they are beneficial to humans and fascinating creatures. NJ bat populations have been on the decline, however, and CWF is working with researchers to study their causes – and to look for solutions. Find out what CWF is doing to help bats in the state and what you can do yourself.  More info